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Are reverse headstock guitars more prone to headstock chime?

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    Are reverse headstock guitars more prone to headstock chime?

    Came across a thread discussing reverse headstocks. One of the comments mentioned that he noticed they were more prone to string chime, quite a few other posters said the same thing. The only reverse headstock guitar ive owned had that issue quite severely, even after using tape and foam it still made a noticeable sound. I ended up buying a Gruvgear wrap for it, that was the best solution i found.

    Has anyone else even noticed that issue on their reverse headstock guitar? do you agree that they are more prone to it compared to a standard headstock?

    #2
    I've found every single reverse headstock guitar I've played suffered from it really badly.

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      #3
      Huh, I guess it makes sense, the opposite E being a thicker string given a bit of room to resonate up there. Too bad they look so cool

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        #4
        I have not... though I have no idea what "string chime" is. I'll also add that I've only ever owned one reverse headstock guitar before (which I have now), but it doesn't have any problematic sounds (buzzing, dead notes, etc.).

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          #5
          Originally posted by Naren View Post
          I have not... though I have no idea what "string chime" is. I'll also add that I've only ever owned one reverse headstock guitar before (which I have now), but it doesn't have any problematic sounds (buzzing, dead notes, etc.).
          Sympathetic resonance behind the nut, basically.

          On regular inline guitars, it's not as big a deal because the high B and E won't generate the powerful overtones that a thick wound string will. You do get problems on the G strings on traditional Strats and Teles, where there isn't a retainer holding that string down and the break angle over the nut is shallow. That can create a resonance that is audible through the amp and muddies up the note and reduces sustain.

          On a reverse HS guitar, the low E will get messier with that much string sitting behind the HS. Probably not enough to be a problem for most guitars, though. It's really on reverse HS 7-strings that you notice the problems. That low B generates a bunch of noise until you dampen it.

          It's the same problem you can get on TOM guitars with the traditional "trapeze" tailpiece that has a lot open string between the saddle and tailpiece, or even on a Les Paul when you have the tailpiece raised very high so that the string doesn't break that sharply over the saddle. It helps reduce string tension and fatten up the tone, but it can created unwanted sympathetic vibration behind the saddles.

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            #6
            Originally posted by jacksonplayer View Post

            Sympathetic resonance behind the nut, basically.

            On regular inline guitars, it's not as big a deal because the high B and E won't generate the powerful overtones that a thick wound string will. You do get problems on the G strings on traditional Strats and Teles, where there isn't a retainer holding that string down and the break angle over the nut is shallow. That can create a resonance that is audible through the amp and muddies up the note and reduces sustain.

            On a reverse HS guitar, the low E will get messier with that much string sitting behind the HS. Probably not enough to be a problem for most guitars, though. It's really on reverse HS 7-strings that you notice the problems. That low B generates a bunch of noise until you dampen it.

            It's the same problem you can get on TOM guitars with the traditional "trapeze" tailpiece that has a lot open string between the saddle and tailpiece, or even on a Les Paul when you have the tailpiece raised very high so that the string doesn't break that sharply over the saddle. It helps reduce string tension and fatten up the tone, but it can created unwanted sympathetic vibration behind the saddles.
            Huh. I'm playing my reverse headstock 7 string right now and I cannot produce the sound you're describing on any of the strings (I'm focusing on the low B and E). I'm not sure if it has to do with the guitar itself or simply with my picking style (but picking way harder and more aggressively than I normally do doesn't produce it either). I guess I should also mention that it's a 27" baritone 7 string with a set of 10 to 59s on it, so maybe it'd happen if the scale was shorter and it had lighter strings?

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              #7
              I've found it's not really an issue with a locking nut.

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                #8
                I absolutely have that problem on my reverse headstock KxK. The low B, E, and A strings all resonate. I have to keep a piece of foam behind the nut to shut it up.

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by jacksonplayer View Post
                  It's really on reverse HS 7-strings that you notice the problems. That low B generates a bunch of noise until you dampen it.
                  The guitar i mentioned was a reverse 7 string. It drove me crazy, i tried everything to lessen the effect but you could still very clearly hear it ringing when palm muting/chugging. I can handle acoustic noises but if it comes through the amp its a deal breaker. Don't think i'll ever get a reverse headstock guitar again. Unless i can try it out first. Dman shame, they look cool as fuck!

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by noodles View Post
                    I absolutely have that problem on my reverse headstock KxK. The low B, E, and A strings all resonate. I have to keep a piece of foam behind the nut to shut it up.
                    My DR7 has it, too. The forced strong break angle of a Floyd nut seems to help prevent it on 7s.

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                      #11
                      Haven't noticed it with my Angel sig but to be fair I'm not exactly playing a lot of tight metal rhythm with it right now.

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                        #12
                        Behind the nut (and bridge) string resonance is pretty annoying on all my guitars so I slap some tape on them because I'm too lazy to put foam under them lol and yeah I have some on my tune-o-matic ones too.

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