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    #26
    Originally posted by Tony View Post

    The only thing to be concerned with is that the impedence matches.

    A friend put a full sized tank in his studio which helped things a lot but it was still kinda naff due to the way its blended into the signal.

    Not fully looked at how it's implemented until the studio but in the mkiic+ changing the valve helped.
    I mean the actual springs. I don't think there's any power running through them, right? It's just their mechanical vibration.

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      #27
      Originally posted by James View Post
      I didn't realise you still had the RT2/50 Leon
      This is my second one. It's actually in better shape than the first. This one seems to have come from Linkin Park's live rig, it was a part of a huge sale, something like 8 of these all went for sale at the same time, and I got a buuuuuunch of Linkin Park case candy

      It's such a cool rock'n roll amp, and pairs well with the E530. Granted, once you A/B it with the 2:90, there's no contest But, if you're just wanting something that sounds cool and is flexible, it's a great power amp.

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        #28
        Originally posted by Leon View Post

        I mean the actual springs. I don't think there's any power running through them, right? It's just their mechanical vibration.
        I've never actually thought too much. At the most I would guess about 10v max but it would discharge really fast.

        My blog and a spot to buy DIY valve amp & effect pedal PCBS www.aurora-audio.co.uk

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          #29
          Originally posted by Tony View Post

          I've never actually thought too much. At the most I would guess about 10v max but it would discharge really fast.
          I'm looking at some rando diagrams of reverb circuits, and it doesn't look like any power actually goes through the springs. It's an electromechanical driver (transducer or tiny speaker) that's driving the springs into motion, and then the reverse at the other end to pick it up. So, the more I think about it... anything that modifies the vibrational constraints of the springs will effectively modify the reverb parameters. Like, a spring that dampens faster will be a shorter reverb, and something with less dampening (the springs sprong-around a bit longer) will be a longer effect.

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            #30
            Originally posted by Leon View Post

            I'm looking at some rando diagrams of reverb circuits, and it doesn't look like any power actually goes through the springs. It's an electromechanical driver (transducer or tiny speaker) that's driving the springs into motion, and then the reverse at the other end to pick it up. So, the more I think about it... anything that modifies the vibrational constraints of the springs will effectively modify the reverb parameters. Like, a spring that dampens faster will be a shorter reverb, and something with less dampening (the springs sprong-around a bit longer) will be a longer effect.
            It should in theory. And you are correct I was thinking of it as a whole unit. Let me know how you get on with this.
            My blog and a spot to buy DIY valve amp & effect pedal PCBS www.aurora-audio.co.uk

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              #31
              I used to have a go-to spring vendor in Toledo. Like, the guy made springs for a living. His shop was just full of boxes of springs of different sizes, strengths, shapes, lengths, etc. Super weird dude, but damn, the guy knew springs. He was able to get me just the right one to put into a vacuum chamber door to get it to close just right. Might work for reverb springs?

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